September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (2024)

Table of Contents
What you need to know There were close to 100 arrests in Louisville overnight, say police It's just past 7:30 a.m. on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what happened overnight: 13 people were arrested in Seattle during Wednesday night's protests Seattle Police make more arrests as protests continue Former Philadelphia police commissioner defends grand jury indictment Journalist Jarrett Hill: The message of this indictment is, "We don't care about you" Portland police declare a riot as protesters stay on the streets Seattle protesters throwing objects at police,eight arrested so far FBI is asking for the public's help in investigating shooting of two police officers It's getting late on the West Coast but protesters are still out San Diego police declare unlawful assembly and order protesters to disperse There was "a lot of sadness and weeping" after grand jury decision, activists say Kamala Harris: "We must never stop speaking Breonna's name" Joe Biden on the Louisville officers who were shot: "violence is & can never be the answer" Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor Athletes express disappointment over Breonna Taylor decision It's just past midnight on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what's going on Breonna Taylor's mother learned of indictment decision two minutes before AG's announcement Colin Kaepernick: "Abolish the police" A vehicle drove into a protest in Denver, one person detained Atlanta police confirm "a number of arrests" at the protests Attorney Ben Crump says indictment is "like killing Breonna all over again" At least 46 arrests made at Louisville protests What the Breonna Taylor protests look like in New York tonight Kentucky governor urges protesters to go home, doesn't want to see any more violence tonight Protests are erupting in multiple cities as night falls Louisville police confirm two officers shot, one suspect in custody Acting DHS Secretary comments on Louisville shooting of police FBI is assisting the Louisville Metro Police with a SWAT team Chicago priest paints Breonna Taylor's name on the street in fake blood Curfew has begun in Louisville as protests continue Joe Biden says the decision in Taylor's case "does not answer" the call for equal justice Louisville Metro police say an officer has been shot Protesters gather in Louisville, DC and New York after decision in Breonna Taylor case Ava DuVernay and Kerry Washington among celebrities speaking out on Breonna Taylor case Louisville chef says it's "disheartening" to see police standoff near his restaurant Trumppraises Kentucky attorney general on Taylor case Former Louisville officer released from jail after surrendering Attorney for Breonna Taylor's family calls prosecutors' decision "offensive and ... egregious" Police confront protesters in downtown Louisville Joe Biden urges protesters to remain peaceful and not engage in violence Former police chief agrees with decision to not indict officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death Louisville mayor says policies need to change "because Breonna Taylor still should be alive" Prosecutors should notact "as kings," says lawyer for Breonna Taylor's boyfriend Jesse Jackson encourages people not to respond to lack of criminal charges in Taylor case with violence Kentucky governor confirms deployment of the National Guard and Kentucky State Police Kentucky governor calls on attorney general to make information in the Taylor case public Chicago mayor calls for citywide moment of silence in honor of Breonna Taylor Large police presence seen in Louisville as protests continue Attorney for one of the officers says grand jury decision shows "system worked" NAACP: "The justice system failed Breonna Taylor and, as such, failed us" Kentucky attorney general defends length of investigation ACLU Kentucky calls Taylor case decision "latest miscarriage of justice" Officers did knock at Taylor's home, attorney general says Kentucky attorney general vows to pursue charges announced today "Sometimes, the criminal lawis not adequate to respond to atragedy," Kentucky attorney general says Kentucky attorney general: If convicted, Hankison faces up to 5 years in prison for each count Kentucky attorney general: Other officers on the scene were "justified in their use of force" Kentucky attorney general: My job was "to put emotionsaside and investigate the facts" Crowd marches in Louisville after grand jury announcement Taylor family attorney: This is "not fully what we wanted" but it "brings us closer to justice" Louisville police officer indicted in Breonna Taylor's case How cities across the South are bracing for the Breonna Taylor annoucement Kentucky commonwealth attorney supports peaceful protests, but will step in when necessary Louisville mayor closes downtown government buildings ahead of Breonna Taylor announcement Louisville police chief calls for people to "peacefully express themselves" Louisville mayor announces curfew beginning 9 p.m. tonight Louisville will pay Breonna Taylor's family $12 million What you need to know about the Breonna Taylor case and the calls for justice Kentucky attorney general to announce grand jury results in Breonna Taylor case GO DEEPER GO DEEPER References

By Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Veronica Rocha, Mike Hayes, Jessie Yeung, Tara John and Ed Upright, CNN

Updated 9:01 PM EDT, Thu September 24, 2020

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (4)

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Protests around country after Breonna Taylor announcement

01:51 - Source: CNN

What you need to know

  • One of the three officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s case was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.
  • Taylor, an EMT, was killed in her own home when three plainclothes Louisville police officersexecuted a “no-knock” warrant. No officers were charged directly with her death.
  • Protesters took to the streets in several US cities after today’s announcement. Louisville police said two officers have been shot and a suspect is in custody.

71 Posts

Our live coverage of the protests following the announcement in the Breonna Taylor case has moved here,

There were close to 100 arrests in Louisville overnight, say police

From CNN’s Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (5)

The shadow of a police officer arresting a demonstrator against a wall in Louisville, Kentucky, on Wednesday.

The Louisville Police Department saysit isstill tallying arrest numbers from unrest across the city last night following Wednesday’s indictment announcement. However, the department believes the arrest count will be close to 100, Sgt. Lamont Washington said in a Thursday morning press release.

Police saidprotesters moved road barricades and began letting traffic into restricted areas, jumped on police cars and set garbage cans on fire. Two officers were injured by gunfire when protestors marched in the area of Brook and College, according to the release.

In addition to arrests and unlawful assembly violations, police say businesses were lootedincluding twoCity Gear stores and a pawn shop. Policeexpect to release additional information on looting locations today, the release added.

It's just past 7:30 a.m. on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what happened overnight:

Protests took place across the US after Wednesday’s indictment in the Breonna Taylor case. Here’s what you need to know:

The indictment:Only one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.

The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.

The public reaction: Demonstrators and activists immediately criticized the charges against the former detective, Brett Hankison.

Attorney Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, called the indictment “outrageous and offensive.” The NAACP also said the justice system “failed” Taylor and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.”

Tamika Palmer,Taylor’s mother, was surrounded by her youngest daughter, sister, and attorneys when she learned that only one officer would be indicted for wanton endangerment.

There was “a lot of sadness and weeping,” said Christopher 2X, a community activist who is assisting Palmer and who stood outside the room when Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the decision.

Athletes including LeBron James, Danny Green, Megan Rapinoe and Kayla McBride expressed their disappointment with the grand jury’s decision.

Jarrett Hill, a politics and pop culture journalist, told CNN that the indictment only confirmed that “the system is not working for us.”

“I think the message to thepeople across this country iswe don’t care about you, especially if you are Black,and even more if you are women,” he said.

The protests: Protesters marched today in several US cities including New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Louisville, Nashville, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Philadelphia.

In some cities, the protests have escalated into clashes with law enforcement; two officers were shot in Louisville, and police fired tear gas at protesters in Atlanta.

Portland Police declared a riot after protestors threw molotov co*cktails, rocks, broke windows and lit fires, according to a press release from the police department.

Political reaction: Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden tweeted that violence should not be the answer “even amidst the profound grief & anger today’s decision.”

His running mate Kamala Harris called for reforms to the justice system in a tweet. “We must never stop speaking Breonna’s name as we work to reform our justice system, including overhauling no-knock warrants,” she wrote.

Charles Ramsey, the former Philadelphia police commissioner and former Washington DC, police chief, told CNN that he agreed with the grand jury’s decision.

“I do believe the one officershould have been charged – what he did was reckless and certainlycriminal.The other two officers, however,that were actually making entryinto the apartment, I agreethey should not have beencharged criminally,” Ramsey told CNN.

13 people were arrested in Seattle during Wednesday night's protests

From CNN’s Joe Sutton and Christina Walker
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (6)

TheSeattlePolice Department has released imagery and information on arrests made Wednesday night.

The Seattle Police Department has just released information on the number of arrests made during last night’s protests in the city.

“In total, officers arrested13 individuals for charges ranging from property destruction, resisting arrest and failure to disperse as well as assault on an officer,” the department said in a news release.

Multiple officers sustained injuries, it added, including “one who was struck in the head with a baseball bat cracking his helmet.”

The police also acknowledged there is footage circulating of an officer’s bike rolling over the head of a person in the street.

“In addition to this, the Seattle Police Department is aware of a video circulating on the internet that apparently shows an SPD bike officer’s bike rolling over the head of an individual laying in the street. This matterwill be referredto the Office of Professional Accountability for further investigation.”

Seattle Police make more arrests as protests continue

From CNN’s Joe Sutton

The Seattle Police have made additional arrests early this morning as protesters continue their violence against authorities, according to the police department.

“Protestors continue to throw rocks, bottles, and even a fire extinguisher at officers. Additional arrests have been made,” police continued in a post on Twitter

Former Philadelphia police commissioner defends grand jury indictment

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (7)

Former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey speaks at an event at Parkway Northwest High School for Peace and Social Justice, in Philadelphia, Pennysylvania, on February 28, 2020.

Charles Ramsey, the former Philadelphia police commissioner and former Washington, DC, police chief, told CNN earlier tonight that he agreed with the grand jury’s decision not to charge a single officer with killing Breonna Taylor.

Only one of the officers involved in her death was indicted, on the charge of first-degree wanton endangerment.

“I do believe the one officershould have been charged – what he did was reckless and certainlycriminal.The other two officers, however,that were actually making entryinto the apartment, I agreethey should not have beencharged criminally,” Ramsey told CNN.

Ramsey said that although Taylor’s death was “unfortunate” and “tragic,” the other officers had been “justified in returning fire” because Taylor’s boyfriend had fired the first shot when the police entered her apartment using a no-knock warrant.

What happened that night: Taylor was sleeping next to her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker III, in the early hours of March 13, when they heard a noise. They both got up and walked to the door.

Police forced entry into the home, and Walker said he couldn’t see but he fired one shot. After entering, an officer was shot in the leg, Attorney General Daniel Cameron said earlier today.

Collectively, the three officers at the scene fired more than 30rounds.

Journalist Jarrett Hill: The message of this indictment is, "We don't care about you"

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (8)

Jarrett Hill attends the Black Women in Entertainment Celebration reception in Los Angeles, on February 27, 2019.

Jarrett Hill, a politics and pop culture journalist, told CNN earlier tonight that the indictment in Breonna Taylor’s case only confirmed that “the system is not working for us.”

“I think the message to thepeople across this country iswe don’t care about you, especially if you are black,and even more if you are women,” he said.

“All of those things combined,put together with this momentof how frustrated we are aboutthe ways Breonna Taylor was treated by the Louisville police,I think it really creates a perfect storm of a lotof things.”

Portland police declare a riot as protesters stay on the streets

From CNN’s Joe Sutton
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (9)

Portland Police declare a riot due to protesters in Porland, Oregon, on September 24.

It’s nearing midnight in Portland, Oregon, but protesters are still active on the streets, even as police urge them to disperse.

The police earlier said those associated with the gathering were part of an unlawful assembly.

Seattle protesters throwing objects at police,eight arrested so far

From CNN’s Joe Sutton
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (10)

Protesters clashed with police in Seattle, Washington, on September 23.

Protesters in Seattle, Washington, have started clashing with law enforcement, according to the Seattle Police Department.

Police added that they had fired pepper spray after protesters cut security cameras at the East Precinct.

Eight people have been arrested so far, police said.

FBI is asking for the public's help in investigating shooting of two police officers

From CNN’s Joe Sutton

The FBI Louisville office is asking for the public’s help for information on those who were involved in the shooting of two police officers in Louisville, Kentucky tonight during the protests.

It's getting late on the West Coast but protesters are still out

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (11)

Protesters march in downtown Los Angeles during a demonstration held to demand justice for the death of Breonna Taylor after the results of a grand jury indictment of former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison in Los Angeles, California, on 23 September.

It’s just past 11:30 p.m. PT on the West Coast, but crowds of protesters are still marching after today’s news of the indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

Protesters are marching in downtown Los Angeles, California, where some demonstrators blocked a police vehicle earlier tonight.

Protesters are also on the streets of Portland, Oregon, where they have gathered near the Justice Center.

People marched in cities across the United States Wednesday, including New York, Philadelphia, Louisville, and Nashville.

San Diego police declare unlawful assembly and order protesters to disperse

Police ordered hundreds of protesters to disperse from downtown San Diego tonight, after clashes between demonstrators and law enforcement.

The police said demonstrators may be arrested if they do not disperse.Officers also said there are several routes allowing free movement out of the area.

There are also other protests happening across the West Coast, including in Los Angeles, California and Portland, Oregon.

There was "a lot of sadness and weeping" after grand jury decision, activists say

Tamika Palmer, Breonna Taylor’s mother, was surrounded by her youngest daughter, sister, and attorneys when she learned that only one officer would be indicted for wanton endangerment.

There was “a lot of sadness and weeping,” said Christopher 2X, a community activist who is assisting Palmer and who stood outside the room when Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced the decision.

As Palmer wiped away her tears, she was embraced by her daughter Bianca Austin and attorney Lonita Baker, who attempted to comfort her.

Baker described it as a “tough” situation and said they were “just loving on each other as a family.”

“We didn’t fathom that it would be a situation where they would indict on charges against the neighbors and absolutely nothing on Breonna,” she said.

Kamala Harris: "We must never stop speaking Breonna's name"

From CNN's Jasmine Wright

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris tweeted about Breonna Taylor on Wednesday night, after the grand jury indictment.

“We must never stop speaking Breonna’s name as we work to reform our justice system, including overhauling no-knock warrants.”

Joe Biden on the Louisville officers who were shot: "violence is & can never be the answer"

From Sarah Mucha

Former Vice President and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has tweeted his thoughts on tonight’s protests and the shooting of two police officers in Louisville:

Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor

By Laura Coates

Editor’s note: Laura Coates is a CNN senior legal analyst. She is a former assistant US attorney for the District of Columbia and trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice. The views expressed in this commentary are her own.

After 195 days, no officer has been arrested or charged for killingBreonna Taylor.

Wednesday’sgrand jury indictment of former Louisville Det. Brett Hankison hasn’t brought justice for the death of Breonna Taylor. Hankison was charged with first-degree wanton endangerment charges because, prosecutors say, bullets from his firearm entered a neighboring apartment where three residents were home. In truth, this has changed nothing.

Justice feels like the elusive carrot that is dangled but never caught.

Consider the fact that Hankison was charged for shooting in the manner that could have killed someone.

No officer has been charged for the fact that someone actually did die.

Here’s the apparent logic behind that decision: Sgt. John Mattingly, Det. Myles Cosgrove and now-fired Det. Hankison executed a warrant on Taylor’s residence. Her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, inside the home at the time, feared they were the victims of a home invasion when the officers banged on the door but, according to Walker, didn’t respond when Taylor asked “Who is it?” before breaking down the door.

As the front door was broken down, Walker fired one shot at the first person to enter the apartment, hitting Mattingly. Mattingly and Cosgrove, returning fire in the direction of Walker, shot six and 16 times respectively,Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said.Hankison, meanwhile, indiscriminately and, according to interim Louisville Police chief Robert Schroeder,“blindly”fired 10 rounds into the apartment.

Collectively, the three officers fired more than 30 rounds. Cameron, citing medical evidence obtained by his team, said thatsix bullets struck Breonna Taylor, with one being fatal.Taylor was in thehallwaywith Walker when she was struck. Prosecutors could not determine who fired the fatal shot or if Hankinson ever shot Taylor, but ultimately concluded that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in their use of force and would not be charged in Taylor’s death. Hankison’s attorney has declined to comment.

Read the full opinion here:

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JUNE 05: Holding a picture of Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old woman, was fatally shot by Louisville Metro Police Department as protesters march in downtown Brooklyn over the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis Police officer on June 05, 2020 in New York City. The white police officer, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with second-degree murder and the three other officers who participated in the arrest have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder. Floyd's death, the most recent in a series of deaths of African Americans at the hands of police, has set off days and nights of protests across the country. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Spencer Platt/Getty Images North America/Getty Images Related article Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor

Athletes express disappointment over Breonna Taylor decision

From CNN's Jill MartinandSaba Hamedy
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (13)

LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on during a game against the Denver Nuggets during Game Two of the Western Conference Finals of the NBA Playoffs at AdventHealth Arena in Orlando, Florida, on September 20.

Athletes – many of whom have used their platforms to take stances against police brutality over the past few months – expressed their disappointment Wednesday after a grand jury in Louisville decided not to charge officerswith killing Breonna Taylor.

Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James said on Twitter, “I’ve been lost for words today!”

“I’m devastated, hurt, sad, mad! We want Justice for Breonna yet justice was met for her neighbors apartment walls and not her beautiful life. Was I surprised at the verdict. Absolutely not but damnit I was & still am hurt and heavy hearted! I send my love to Breonna mother, family and friends! I’m sorry! I’m sorry! I’m sorry!!”

His Lakers teammate Danny Green said in a news conference that the decision was a “disappointment,” and that “our voices aren’t being heard loud enough.” But Green added that “we’re going to continue fighting, we’re going to continue to push, we’re going to continue to use our voices.”

WNBA player Kayla McBride, a guard on the Las Vegas Aces, said the news is “a tough pill to swallow, because it’s a large part of why we’re here.”

USWNT star Megan Rapinoe also wrote on Twitter, “My heart is with the family of Breonna Taylor right now. My god. This is devastating and unfortunately not surprising. Black and brown folx in this country deserve so much more.”

It's just past midnight on the East Coast. Here's a catch up on what's going on

It’s just past midnight Eastern Time, and protests are ongoing across the country after Wednesday’s indictment in the Breonna Taylor case. Here’s what you need to know:

The indictment:Only one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges.

The other two officers who also fired shots during the botched March raid were not indicted, meaning no officer was charged with killing Taylor.

The public reaction: Demonstrators and activists immediately criticized the charges against the former detective, Brett Hankison.

Attorney Ben Crump, who represents Taylor’s family, called the indictment “outrageous and offensive.” The NAACP also said the justice system “failed” Taylor and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.”

The protests: Protesters marched today in several US cities including New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Louisville, Nashville, Las Vegas, Atlanta and Philadelphia.

In some cities, the protests have escalated into clashes with law enforcement; two officers were shot in Louisville, and police fired tear gas at protesters in Atlanta.

Breonna Taylor's mother learned of indictment decision two minutes before AG's announcement

From CNN’s Mark Morales and Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (14)

Breonna Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer listens during a press conference over the speed of the investigation of her daughter's death as attorney Benjamin Crump and co-counsel Lonita Baker address the media outside Louisville City Hall in Louisville, Kentucky, on August 13.

Breonna Taylor’s mother learned about the results of the grand jury indictment just two minutes before Attorney General Daniel Cameron made his announcement, even after It was expected the family would have a heads-up on the decision, family attorney Sam Aguiar told CNN.

CNN has reached out to the attorney general’s office for comment.

Colin Kaepernick: "Abolish the police"

Quarterback and civil rights activist Colin Kaepernick tweeted his reaction to the Breonna Taylor indictment on Wednesday, saying, “The white supremacist institution of policing that stole Breonna Taylor’s life from us must be abolished for the safety and well being of our people.”

He included the hashtags “Breonna Taylor,” “Say Her Name,” and “Abolish The Police.”

A vehicle drove into a protest in Denver, one person detained

From CNN’s Joe Sutton
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (15)

The Denver Police Department said they are on the scene where a vehicle drove into a protest in the city’s downtown this evening.

The police department confirmed on Twitter that there were no injuries and one man has been detained.

Atlanta police confirm "a number of arrests" at the protests

From CNN’s Joe Sutton
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (16)

Atlanta police arrest protesters on Wednesday night.

Protesters took to the streets in downtown Atlanta, Georgia on Wednesday after news broke that no police officer had been charged with killing Breonna Taylor.

Several protesters have been arrested this evening, the police department said.

The police department will release the final tally of arrests on Thursday.

Attorney Ben Crump says indictment is "like killing Breonna all over again"

Ben Crump, the attorney for Breonna Taylor’s family, told CNN tonight that the family is “outraged” by the grand jury’s decision not to charge the Louisville police officers with killing Taylor.

“It’s like killing Breonna all overagain.Legalized genocide of people ofcolor, because no matter how much evidence wehave, they always find a way totry to legally justify it,” Crump said. “The DA can indict a ham sandwichif they want to … We strongly feel they did notwant an indictment against thesepolice officers.”

“We stand here today to say thatthere is no justification forthe murder of Breonna Taylor.And we will go to our gravesproclaiming that Breonna Taylordid not get justice from theKentucky attorney general’soffice.”

Grand jury’s decision: One of the three officers involved in Taylor’s case was indicted on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The two other officers will face no charges following months of demonstrations and unrest over the killing.

At least 46 arrests made at Louisville protests

From CNN’s Elizabeth Joseph

Police in Louisville, Kentucky, have made up to 46 arrests today as protesters took to the downtown streets, according to Louisville Police Sgt.Lamont Washington.

Protests turned chaotic earlier tonight, with two police officers shot. Neither have life-threatening injuries, and are receiving treatment, police said. One suspect is in custody.

A 72-hour curfew went into effect in Louisville at 9 p.m. ET.

What the Breonna Taylor protests look like in New York tonight

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (17)

Members of Black Lives Matters (BLM) are joined by hundreds of others during an evening protest following the grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case outside of the Barclays Center on September 23 in Brooklyn.

Hundreds of protesters are still out in New York, heading back from Manhattan to Brooklyn across the Williamsburg Bridge.

The crowd gathered earlier in the day in Brooklyn at the Barclays Center, before crossing the Manhattan Bridge into the East Village.

“We’re talking about hundredsand hundreds, if not more than1,000 or so, people out in thestreets.It’s a festive atmosphere.There has been drumming, there’s a trumpet player.A guy on roller skates with aguitar.So it’s a festive atmosphere –but they are still angry, Ishould say … very, very angry about the results of this case.

Kentucky governor urges protesters to go home, doesn't want to see any more violence tonight

From CNN’s Alec Snyder
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (18)

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear urged protesters to go home tonight, after two police officers were shot in Louisville, the city where Breonna Taylor was killed.

“There will be many times over the coming days where there will be an opportunity to be heard and so many people are listening right now. As your governor, I’ve promised to listen.”

Beshear added that he is thinking about the two injured officers and their family.

“But let’s make sure we don’t see any more violence tonight, and let’s make sure that we find ways of expressing ourselves moving forward where your point and other people’s points are made and that hopefully we can not just listen, but we can hear,” he said, urging people to “stay safe.”

Protests are erupting in multiple cities as night falls

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (19)

Protesters react to gunfire on Wednesday night in Louisville, Kentucky.

As night falls, large protests are taking place in several major US cities following the grand jury indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

In Louisville, Kentucky, where Taylor was killed, two police officers have been shot during the protests. Crowds are still out despite a 72-hour curfew that went into effect at 9 p.m. ET. Some 500 members of the Kentucky National Guard were deployed earlier in the day, and a heavy police presence was deployed downtown to clear the streets during curfew.

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (20)

Members of Black Lives Matters (BLM) are joined by hundreds of others during an evening protest against the Kentucky grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case outside of the Barclays Center on Wednesday night in Brooklyn.

In New York, several hundred protesters are assembled in Manhattan. They started gathering hours ago in Brooklyn near the Barclays Center, before marching across the Manhattan Bridge into the East Village. Protesters on the street are diverse, including parents and families earlier in the evening.

One protester on a bicycle was struck by a pickup truck upstate in Buffalo, New York, earlier tonight. The bicyclist has non-life threatening injuries, police said.

In Atlanta, protests stayed peaceful for hours, with hundreds of protesters marching through the city’s downtown. But things heated up later in the evening, with the Georgia State Patrol deploying tear gas against the protesters.

Other cities with protests include Nashville, Tennessee; Columbus, Ohio; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; St. Paul, Minnesota; Washington, DC; and Chicago, Illinois.

Louisville police confirm two officers shot, one suspect in custody

From CNN’s Andy Rose
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (21)

Louisville Metro Police Department Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder speaks to the media as he confirms two officers have been shot, after protesters clashed with police in Louisville, Kentucky, on September 23.

Two officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department were shot Wednesday night during protests of the Breonna Taylor case, the interim chief of the Louisville Police Department confirmed in a press briefing.

Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder told reporters that one officer is in surgery, and both are in stable condition. A suspect is in custody, according to Schroeder.

“I am very concerned about the safety of our officers,” Schroeder said.

Schroeder said that around 8:30 p.m. ET, officers had been deployed downtown after shots were fired in a crowded area.

The names of the officers were not released.

Acting DHS Secretary comments on Louisville shooting of police

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (22)

Chad Wolf, acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, speaks during a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, on Wednesday, September 23.

Chad Wolf, Acting Secretary for the Department of Homeland Security, has commented on the shooting of police in the protests in Louisville tonight.

CNN has only confirmed one officer has been shot.

FBI is assisting the Louisville Metro Police with a SWAT team

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

The FBI Louisville field office said it has deployed a SWAT team to respond to a Louisville Metro Police Department officer being shot and “will continue to assist in the investigation.”

The department has not provided additional details on the shooting. The department has scheduled a news conference tonight.

Chicago priest paints Breonna Taylor's name on the street in fake blood

From CNN's ChristinaZdanowicz

Father Michael Pfleger led a group of protesters in Chicago, Illinois, today before using fake blood to paint Breonna Taylor’s name in the street.

Curfew has begun in Louisville as protests continue

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

The 72-hour curfew is underway in Louisville, Kentucky, as protests continue following the grand jury indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

The curfew is in effect from 9 p.m. ET to 6:30 a.m. ET.

Because most protest-related violence over the past few months occurred after dark, Mayor Greg Fischer signed an executive order setting a countywide curfew.

“The curfew is related to the well-being of our citizens and businesses due to the potential unrest,” theexecutive ordersaid.

Joe Biden says the decision in Taylor's case "does not answer" the call for equal justice

From CNN's Sarah Mucha
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (23)

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, flanked by members of his Secret Service detail, speaks to media about the Breonna Taylor ruling and other topics before boards a plane at Charlotte Douglas International Airport in Charlotte, North Carolina on Wednesday.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has released a statement following the grand jury decision not to charge the Louisville officers with killing Breonna Taylor, saying that he knows that for so many people, the decision “does not answer” the call for equal justice.

He added that the federal investigation remains ongoing, but in order to address the injustice, “we need to start by addressing the use of excessive force, banning choke holds, and overhauling no-knock warrants.”

Biden once again warned that violence is “never acceptable” but notes that people have a right to peacefully protest.

Louisville Metro police say an officer has been shot

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (24)

Police block the road near the scene where it is believed an officer has been shot in Louisville, Kentucky, on Wedneday September 23.

The Louisville Metro Police Department announced Wednesday night that one officer has been shot.

The department did not provide additional details.

“We currently have an officer shot,” department spokesperson Sgt. Lamont Washington said in a news statement.

“We’ll update when we can,” he added.

Watch CNN coverage here:

Protesters gather in Louisville, DC and New York after decision in Breonna Taylor case

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (25)

Protesters gather, Wednesday, September 23, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Protesters are gathering tonight in Louisville, New York and Washington, DC, following the Kentucky attorney general’s decision to not charge officers directly with Breonna Taylor’s death.

One of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death was charged today with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree. No officers were charged directly with her death.

Crowds of demonstrators marched along Black Lives Matter Plaza in DC.

Several hundred people gathered outside theBarclays Center in Brooklyn, New York, and chanted, “we want justice for Breonna.”

Angelo Pinto wore a black mask that read “Breonna Taylor” as he and others marched through the streets of Louisville, Kentucky, where a city curfew goes into effect at 9 p.m. local time.

“No justice, no peace,” the protesters chanted. Pinto is the co-founder of Until Freedom, a social justice organization fighting against systemic and racial injustice.

CNN’s ChristinaZdanowicz contributed to this report.

Watch CNN coverage here:

Ava DuVernay and Kerry Washington among celebrities speaking out on Breonna Taylor case

From CNN's Megan Thomas

Numerous leaders in the entertainment industry who have been calling for justice for Breonna Taylor are speaking out after a Kentucky grand jury on Wednesday determined police would not be directly charged in her death.

Here are what some celebrities said:

  • Director Ava DuVernay: “God bless Breonna’s family and all who knew and loved her. Her tragic death compounded by the violence of silence and inaction by the city she called home is more than any of them should have to endure,” she wrote in a statement on Twitter.
  • Actor, producer and advocate Kerry Washington: “I understand the desire to not vote. To reject a system that abuses you & denies your worth. But please know that the system DOES see your worth. It’s AFRAID of your power. That’s why it works so hard to make you feel powerless. You are NOT powerless. #SayHerName. And Vote!”
  • Musician Alicia Keys: “This is a PRIME example of Rotten to the CORE!!! UnJust!!!! Disrespectful and BLATANT DISREGARD!!!! Infuriated!!!!!!!” she tweeted.
  • Actor George Clooney, a Kentucky native: “I know the community. I know the commonwealth. And I was taught in the schools and churches of Kentucky what is right and what is wrong. I’m ashamed of this decision,” the actor wrote in a statement obtained by CNN.

Louisville chef says it's "disheartening" to see police standoff near his restaurant

From CNN's ChristinaZdanowicz

Chef Anthony Lamas told CNN it is “disheartening” to see police and protesters two blocks from his restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky.

He is the owner and chef of Seviche restaurant, which is on Bardstown Road.

“Two blocks in front of my restaurant, it’s getting real,” Lamas said in an Instagram video. “This is the road that leads to my restaurant, but I’m not really sure of what to think.”

Lamas said he had to close the restaurant tonight because of the protests. He added how hard it’s been financially to operate at a 50% capacity due to the pandemic.

“It’s pretty intense right now but I didn’t think any of this would happen to Bardstown Road,” he said in one of his Instagram videos, as police gave announcements over a loud speaker.

Trumppraises Kentucky attorney general on Taylor case

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (26)

President Trump praised the remarks made by Kentucky Republican Attorney General Daniel Cameron when asked Wednesday evening to weigh in on charges related to the Breonna Taylor case.

During a White House press briefing, Trump called Cameron’s statement “brilliant” and said he was doing “a fantastic job” and called him “a star.”

“I will be speaking with the governor,” Trump said, adding that he has a call scheduled. “I understand that he’s called up the National Guard, which is a good thing.”

“It’ll all work out,” he added.

Earlier Wednesday,Trump would not weigh in on whether justice was served in the Taylor case, after it was announced on Wednesday that no officers would be charged directly in her death.

Asked during an event at the White House Wednesday afternoon whether justice had been served, Trump told reporters, “I don’t know enough about it. I heard a decision was just made. We’ve been together here so we haven’t discussed it. But after I see what the decision is, I will have a comment.”

CNN reported earlier Wednesdaythat a former Louisville police officer has been indicted by a grand jury on first-degree wanton endangerment charges for his actions on the night Taylor, a Black woman, was killed by police — but not for her death. Two other officers at the shooting were not indicted.

He went on to tout his usual policy points he sees as successes for the Black community: opportunity zones, criminal justice reform, prison reform and Historically Black Colleges and Universities

“Nobody’s done more. Abraham Lincoln let’s give him the nod, but beyond that, nobody’s done more,” Trump said.

Former Louisville officer released from jail after surrendering

From CNN’s Jamiel Lynch and Laura James
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (27)

Former Louisville Metro Police officer Brett Hankison was released from jail Wednesday after surrendering to authorities and posting bond, his attorney Stew Matthews told CNN.

Hankison, one of the three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, was charged today with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

His bail was listed at $15,000 on an indictment released by Kentucky’s Jefferson County Circuit Court earlier in the day.

Hankison was booked at the Shelby County jail, according to Matthews, who declined to provide additional details, saying he “can’t comment at this time because I don’t know enough about all of the facts.”

Attorney for Breonna Taylor's family calls prosecutors' decision "offensive and ... egregious"

From CNN's Josiah Ryan
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (28)

Lonita Baker

Lonita Baker, an attorney representing Breonna Taylor’s family,responded to prosecutors’ decision not to charge police officers involved in the death of Taylor with murder, saying the decision was both “offensive and … egregious.”

Speaking with CNN’S Wolf Blitzer, Baker targeted Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s theory that police officers had acted in self-defense because Taylor’s boyfriend had fired first, saying the attorney general “needs to continue to research the law on self-defense in Kentucky.”

“It did not take six times to shoot an unarmed woman,” added Baker. “They were not entitled to self-defense. They were not justified under self-defense in this case.”

Watch here:

Police confront protesters in downtown Louisville

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (29)

Police confronted protesters in downtown Louisville hours after a Jefferson County grand jury charged former Louisville officer Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

Aerial video from CNN affiliate WLKY showed heavy police presence along with large groups of protesters gathering at intersections. Video showed some of these groups involved in shoving matches and confrontations with police.

A citywide curfew for Louisville will go into effect at 9 p.m. local time.

Watch here:

Joe Biden urges protesters to remain peaceful and not engage in violence

From CNN's Arlette Saenz
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (30)

In an interview with Charlotte CNN affiliate WSOC, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden urged any one protesting after the announcement of charges in the Breonna Taylor case to remain peaceful and not engage in violence.

Biden did not comment further on the decision; he said he was waiting for more details.

Former police chief agrees with decision to not indict officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death

From CNN's Leinz Vales
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (31)

Former Philadelphia police chief Charles Ramsey

Former Philadelphia police chief Charles Ramsey said Wednesday that he agrees with Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s decision to not indict the police officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s death.

“Based on what he presented at the press conference, I agree totally,” Ramsey said.

The former police chief and CNN contributor cited the actions of Taylor’s boyfriend,Kenneth Walker, the night of her death as a significant factor for charges not being filed in her death.

Ramsey went on to add his insight from his many years in law enforcement.

“It’s a high risk every time you execute a warrant,” Ramsey said. “When they hit that door and went inside, they saw an individual fire a gun, one officer went down, they returned fire. That’s the information they had at the time. It’s certainly tragic, there’s no question about that. But you have to look at the moment and what took place. And that seems to be somehow being lost in this conversation.”

Watch here:

Louisville mayor says policies need to change "because Breonna Taylor still should be alive"

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (32)

Mayor Greg Fischer

Acknowledging that there are people who feel the announcement by the Kentucky attorney general’s office “fall short of achieving justice,” Mayor Greg Fischer outlined other ongoing investigations into Breonna Taylor’s death.

The FBI is still conducting its investigation that the Department of Justice will review to determine if any federal laws, including civil rights violations, were violated.

The Louisville Metro Police Department is also conducting a professional standards investigation to determine if “policies and procedures were violated by officers involved in the case,” Fischer said.

It’s clear that policies and procedures in Louisville need to change “because Breonna Taylor still should be alive,” the mayor added.

Justice for Taylor means “a commitment to eliminating systemic and structural racism in our city, in our country,” Fischer said.

He appealed to the people of Louisville to “turn to each other, not on each other” during what he called “this moment of opportunity.”

Prosecutors should notact "as kings," says lawyer for Breonna Taylor's boyfriend

From CNN's Josiah Ryan

The attorney for Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend slammed prosecutors’ decision not to charge police officers involved in the death of Taylor with murder, saying the case should go before a jury.

“If they’ve got a defense, which they do, let them present to a jury and see if a jury agrees with them,” Steven Romines, the attorney for Kenneth Walker III, told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer this afternoon.

“Our system of justice depends on jurors and letting jurors decide,” he continued. “It is not prosecutors acting as kings and saying, ‘no, we’re not going to charge whoever we don’t want charged’… that’s what’s occurred here… and it is a tragedy.”

Watch here:

Jesse Jackson encourages people not to respond to lack of criminal charges in Taylor case with violence

From CNN’s Andy Rose
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (33)

Civil rights activist Jesse Jackson encouraged people upset by the lack of criminal charges in the death of Breonna Taylor not to respond with violence, noting the coming presidential election.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said they are not implementing preemptive measures against possible unrest that they have used in the past, such as closing bridges to the city.

“We have evolved in the way in which we’re handling these circ*mstances,” Lightfoot said.

Jackson also called for protesters to respond to the decision of the grand jury by boycotting “every non-essential service in Kentucky,” adding that he believes athletes recruited to the University of Louisville and the University of Kentucky should not go to those schools.

“We should put Kentucky on the South African list,” Jackson said, referring to international boycotts of that country during its policy of apartheid.

Kentucky governor confirms deployment of the National Guard and Kentucky State Police

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (34)

Luna J. confronts a National Guard vehicle after the Supreme Courts' decision in the Breonna Taylor case was announced Wednesday. September 23.

Members of the Kentucky National Guard and Kentucky State Police have been activated to work in Louisville, Gov. Andy Beshear said this afternoon.

The National Guard’s deployment is “limited” in scope, they have specific operations, and are under their own command, he said.

There is also a limited group of Kentucky State Police operating in Louisville to assist the Louisville Metro Police Department, the governor said. They too are under their own command and are there to provide assistance if needed.

Kentucky governor calls on attorney general to make information in the Taylor case public

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (35)

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear called on Attorney General Daniel Cameron to publicly release information relating to his office’s investigation into Breonna Taylor’s death.

In his news conference earlier this afternoon, Cameron spoke about information, facts and evidence that neither the governor nor the public had seen, he said.

Beshear has asked for information that won’t impact the counts outlined in the indictment to be publicly released.

Chicago mayor calls for citywide moment of silence in honor of Breonna Taylor

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot called for a citywide moment of silence Wednesday night to honor Breonna Taylor,after a Kentucky grand jury declined to press any charges directly related to Taylor’s shooting death by Louisville Police.

The moment of silence is scheduled for 7 p.m. local time, and Lightfoot says she hopes the city will respect the family’s request for protests to be peaceful.

“I want you to know that I support you and will do everything in my power to protect you as you voice your righteous anger,” Lightfoot said.

Large police presence seen in Louisville as protests continue

Large numbers of police officers dressed in riot gear have been seen in Louisville, Kentucky, this afternoon following the news that a grand jury has indicted one officer involved in Breonna Taylor’s death.

Numerous people have been seen approaching the lines of officers to talk while others took photos and videos.

Attorney for one of the officers says grand jury decision shows "system worked"

From CNN’s Taylor Romine

An attorney for one of the officers involved in the Breonna Taylor case issued a statement after the grand jury’s announcement and decision not to indict his client, saying it shows the “system worked.”

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly’s attorney, Kent J. Wicker, said, “The grand jury’s decision to not indict Sgt. Mattingly or Det. [Myles] Cosgrove shows that the system worked and that grand jurors recognized and respected the facts of the case.”

NAACP: "The justice system failed Breonna Taylor and, as such, failed us"

From CNN's Rashard Rose

The NAACP said in a statement following the announcement of the grand jury decision in the Breonna Taylor case that the justice system “failed” her and the charges against one officer do “not go far enough.”

“The justice system failed Breonna Taylor and, as such, failed us,” the statement added.

Kentucky attorney general defends length of investigation

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said his office’s investigation took so long because of how thorough it was.

Breonna Taylor, her family, officers, Louisville and the Commonwealth of Kentucky deserved a thorough investigation, he said.

The length of the investigation was a reflection “of how important it was to get this right,” he said.

In the news conference, Cameron also said his office’s investigation started “fromscratch” as there was no body cam footage related to the case.

Watch here:

ACLU Kentucky calls Taylor case decision "latest miscarriage of justice"

The American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky responded in a tweet to the indictment of one officer in the Breonna Taylor case.

Read the statement:

Officers did knock at Taylor's home, attorney general says

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said his office determined the police officers knocked and announced their presence at Breonna Taylor’s home when she was killed.

That determination was made based on statements by other officers who were present at the location, and that information was corroborated by another civilian witness who was nearby at the time, he said.

Some background: Taylor was killed in March. The officers broke down the door to her apartment while executing a late-night, “no-knock” warrant in a narcotics investigation on March 13.

Following her death, the Louisville city council in June passed Breonna’s Law, which banned no-knock warrants and requires officers serving search warrants to wear body cameras.

Watch here:

Kentucky attorney general vows to pursue charges announced today

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron vowed to “vigorously prosecute” the criminal charges announced against one of the three officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s case.

A grand jury announced earlier today it was indicting former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

Cameron also announced that he was creating “a task force to reviewthe process for securingsecuring and executing searchwarrants in Kentucky.” Members of the public, law enforcement, elected officials, defense attorneys and representatives from the judiciary will be included in the task force, he said.

“Ibelieve having a top-to-bottomreview of the search warrantprocess is necessary todetermine if changes arerequired and establish the bestpractices,” he said.

Watch here:

"Sometimes, the criminal lawis not adequate to respond to atragedy," Kentucky attorney general says

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron called Breonna Taylor’s death “a tragedy” and said that “sometimes, the criminal lawis not adequate,” he said today during a news conference in Louisville.

Watch here:

Kentucky attorney general: If convicted, Hankison faces up to 5 years in prison for each count

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced that the grand jury voted to returnan indictment for three felony countsof wanton endangerment against former Louisville detective Brett Hankison.

Cameron said that if convicted, Hankison “can serve up tofive years for each count.”

“My office is prepared to provethese charges at trial,” Cameron said. “However, it’s important to notehe is presumed innocent untilproven guilty.”

Watch here:

Kentucky attorney general: Other officers on the scene were "justified in their use of force"

Following the indictment of one officer involved in the shooting of Breonna Taylor, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the other two officers on the scene were “justified in their use of force.”

Moments ago, a Jefferson County grand jurycharged former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

Officers MylesCosgrove and JonathanMattingly were not indicted. Cameron said their actions the night Taylor died were justified after Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend, fired first.

An FBI crime lab determined Cosgrove fired the shot that killed Taylor. “Six bullets struck Ms. Taylorand… only one shotwas fatal,” Cameron said, adding she would have died within “a few seconds to twominutes.”

Watch here:

Kentucky attorney general: My job was "to put emotionsaside and investigate the facts"

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (36)

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron began his announcement on the Breonna Taylor case by again issuing condolences to her family.

He said the pain many across the country feel is “understandable.”

“In this case, a human life was lost. We can not forget that,” Cameron said.

However, Cameron said his job required him to “investigate the facts.”

“My job as the special prosecutorin this case was to put emotionsaside and investigate the factsto determine if criminalviolations of state law resultedin the loss of Ms. Taylor’slife,” he added.

Moments ago, a Jefferson County grand jury has charged former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison, one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s case, with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

Watch:

Crowd marches in Louisville after grand jury announcement

rowd of demonstrators started marching in downtown Louisville after a grand jury announced that one of the three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor was indicted.

CNN’s Shimon Prokupecz, who was on the scene, said they were waiting for theattorney general’s news conference, “so he could explain himself andhow he proceeded with this case,why he chose the route he chose.”

He noted that there was no police presence.

“I think the police sort of havesaid that they were going toallow protesters to come to thisarea, to peacefully protest,” Prokupecz said.

Taylor family attorney: This is "not fully what we wanted" but it "brings us closer to justice"

Ben Crump, attorney for the family of Breonna Taylor, tweeted following the announcement that one of the officers involved had been indicted in the case.

Crump said the announcement that former officer Brett Hankinson was indicted on wanton endangerment was “not fully what we wanted,” but added “this brings us closer to justice” for Taylor.

Read his tweet:

Louisville police officer indicted in Breonna Taylor's case

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (37)

Former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison

A Jefferson County grand jury has charged former Louisville police officer Brett Hankison, one of the three officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor, with three counts of wanton endangerment of the first degree.

Hankison was fired from the department more than three months after Taylor’s death. He was informed in a letter signed by the police chief that his employment with the department“is terminated,”effective immediately.

Hankison violated standard operating procedure when his “actions displayed an extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly fired ten (10) rounds” into Taylor’s apartment, then Police Chief Robert Schroeder wrote in the letter.

How cities across the South are bracing for the Breonna Taylor annoucement

From CNN's DevonSayers, Jason Morris and Gregory Lemos

Cities across the American South are on alert as Louisville and the nation wait on the announcement of a decision in the Breonna Taylor investigation.

In Atlanta, police officer Anthony W. Grant, the Atlanta Police Department is “monitoring the Breonna Taylor court decision closely and we are prepared to make adjustments as necessary.”

The city of Atlanta had a number of protests, some turned violent and destructive, this summer. One incident in the downtown area resulted in six Atlanta officers being charged with using excessive force. The unrest lead to Gov. Brian Kemp sending in the National Guard to help restore calm.

Meanwhile, in Little Rock, Arkansas, Lt. Casey Clark,public affairs commander of thecity’s police department, told CNN that while Little Rock is not “moving barricades in and closing streets down like in Louisville,” they “are monitoring the situation.”

“We have asked our personnel to have situational awareness and be prepared to come in if needed, if not already on duty. Our Department maintains on-going plans/procedures to deal with both protests and civil unrest,” Casey told CNN Wednesday.

And in Knoxville, Tennessee, police are monitoring the decision as well.

“The Knoxville Police Department is and will continue to monitor the situation, and we are prepared to respond appropriately to maintain public safety,” Knoxville Police Department Communications Manager Scott Erland told CNN Wednesday.

CNN has reached out to governors, mayors, and police departments across the regional South but has only heard back from what is reported above.

Kentucky commonwealth attorney supports peaceful protests, but will step in when necessary

From CNN’s Mark Morales

Kentucky’s Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine told CNN that his office supports peaceful protests, but will get involved if someone intentionally causes destruction of property,someone uses a weapon which could constitute wonton endangerment or is involved in an assault.

“But the rest of it, people protesting and marching demanding justice, I’m all for it. Let them march. Let them have that opportunity. Let the people in leadership positions understand the depth of their feelings and their concerns,” Wine said.

In recent months, most of the protesters have been charged with misdemeanor offenses such as obstruction of traffic or disorderly conduct and those cases were handled by the county attorney, Mike O’Connell, who has dismissed a lot of them, according Wine.

Louisville mayor closes downtown government buildings ahead of Breonna Taylor announcement

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (38)

A memorial to Breonna Taylor, placed in Jefferson Square Park, is photographed in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday, September 23, as the city anticipates of the results of a grand jury inquiry into the death of Breonna Taylor.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced that some government building in the city’s downtown area will be closed the rest of today and tomorrow as the city prepares for an expected announcement in the Breonna Taylor case.

“And I’m asking downtown areabusinesses to allow employees towork remotely as well wheneverpossible,” he said at a news conference.

These are the buildings that will be closing, according to the mayor:

  • Metro Hall and its Annex
  • City Hall and its Annex
  • Fiscal Court
  • The Sinking Fund
  • Louisville Metro Police Department headquarters
  • Metro Development and Metro Safe on South Fifth Street
  • Youth Detention Services
  • The Alexander Building on West Main
  • The Downtown Wellness Center on First Street

Taylor’s case, along with other high-profile killings of Black people by police, have sparked protestsin Louisville and across the US over racial injustice.

Louisville police chief calls for people to "peacefully express themselves"

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (39)

Louisville Metro Police Chief Robert Schroeder

Louisville Metro Police Chief Robert Schroederspoke ahead of an expected grand jury announcement in the Breonna Taylor case.

Schroeder detailed various street closures that are happening in Louisville today and said that all vacation days and off days have been canceled for police this week.

The chief also confirmed that the Kentucky National Guard has been activated.

In anticipation of demonstrations in the city, the chief called for anyone gathering to “peacefully express themselves.”

Louisville mayor announces curfew beginning 9 p.m. tonight

September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (40)

Louisville Mayor Greg Fische

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Robert Schroeder announced Wednesday a countywide curfew starting tonight at 9 p.m. local time.

The 72-hour curfew will be between 9 p.m. to 6:30 a.m., he said.

Louisville will pay Breonna Taylor's family $12 million

From CNN's Mark Morales,Eric Levenson, Elizabeth Joseph andChristina Carrega
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (41)

The city of Louisville, Kentucky, agreed to pay $12 million to the family ofBreonna Taylorand institute sweeping police reforms in a historic settlement of the family’s wrongful death lawsuit.

Mayor Greg Fischer, Taylor’s family and their attorneys announced the settlement at a joint news conference on Sept. 15. Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, waskilled in her home by policeon March 13.

As part of the settlement, the city agreed to establish a housing credit program as an incentive for officers to live in the areas they serve; use social workers to provide support on certain police runs; and require commanders to review and approve search warrants before seeking judicial approval, among other changes.

A spokesperson for the mayor’s office confirmed the $12 million settlement is the highest-ever paid by the city. Family attorney Benjamin Crump called the payout “historic” and said he believed it is one of the largest amounts ever paid out for a Black woman killed by police in the US.

Mayor Fischer said the city is not admitting wrongdoing in the agreement.

“I cannot begin to imagine Ms. Palmer’s pain,” Fischer said. “And I am deeply, deeply sorry for Breonna’s death.”

What you need to know about the Breonna Taylor case and the calls for justice

From CNN's Christina Carregaand Elizabeth Joseph
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (42)

A demonstrator holds a sign with the image of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman who was fatally shot by Louisville Metro Police Department officers.

Breonna Taylor, an EMT and aspiring nurse, was killed in her own home in March when three plainclothes Louisville police officersexecuting a “no-knock” warrantreturned gunfire after her boyfriend fired a warning shot because he thought he was shooting at intruders.

None of the officers have been chargedwith a crime. Two of the officers remain on the force. A third officer wasfiredand is appealing to get his job back.

The FBI is investigating whether Taylor’s civil rights were violated. The city of Louisville, Kentucky, agreed to pay $12 million to the family ofBreonna Taylorand institute sweeping police reforms in a historic settlement of the family’s wrongful death lawsuit.

Protests and calls for justice: What’s seen as a delay of justice for Taylor’s family has moved millions around the world, shaking the consciousness and gaining support from a wide group of stakeholders, including celebrities like NBA superstarLeBron Jamesand Oprah Winfrey who have spoken out against racial injustice.

As a rallying cry, the hashtag #SayHerName has been plastered across signs and social media, and sung at rallies by marchers for social justice across America this summer as the investigations for the deaths of Black men at the hands of police — includingGeorge Floyd— seem to have moved faster through the criminal justice system.

Kentucky attorney general to announce grand jury results in Breonna Taylor case

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will hold a news conference at1:30 p.m. ETto announce the results of grand jury proceedings in the investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor, his office announced in a statement.

The news conference will take place that the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort, the state’s capital, the statement from the attorney general’s office said.

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Breonna Taylor settlement is among largest payouts linked to a police shooting

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Breonna Taylor settlement is among largest payouts linked to a police shooting
September 23 Breonna Taylor news | CNN (2024)

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